This Couple Has Been on the Keto Diet for 6 Years Together—and They Have Some Genius Advice for Sticking to It

Dave Harper and Dale Drewery are not only romantic partners, they're keto diet partners as well. In 2013, the couple, who live in Vancouver and have been together for 22 years, decided to give the high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet a try. Six years and 40 or so pounds later, they're still going strong on keto. In fact, they recently published a book, BioDiet, that covers […]

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Uncovering secrets of bone marrow cells and how they differentiate

Bone marrow contains biological factories, which pump out billions of new blood cells daily. The non-blood cells that maintain this production also have the potential to produce bone, fat and cartilage. This output all starts from stem cells that have the ability to differentiate into various types of cells. Knowledge of the genes that control this differentiation and the paths […]

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Grandparents: Raising their children’s children, they get the job done

Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families. New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2018 National Conference & Exhibition shows that caregivers who step up to raise their grandchildren are overcoming unique challenges to manage just as well as […]

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Hit ’em where they eat: Stealth drug fights resistant bacteria

The lack of new antibiotics is among the most critical challenges facing medicine. Researchers have been on the hunt for new drugs to combat “superbugs” that cannot be penetrated by current antibiotics. Rather than looking for drugs that forcibly penetrate bacteria, researchers tried a new approach: tricking bacteria into taking up a molecule that looks like food, but wreaks havoc […]

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‘Prevalence induced concept change’ causes people to re-define problems as they are reduced, study says

Although it’s far from perfect by virtually any measure—whether poverty rates, violence, access to education, racism and prejudice or any number of others—the world continues to improve. Why, then, do polls consistently show that people believe otherwise? The answer, Daniel Gilbert says, may lie in a phenomenon called “prevalence induced concept change.” As demonstrated in a series of new studies, […]

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The latest blood pressure guidelines—what they mean for you

,Updated blood pressure guidelines from the American Heart Association mean that many more Americans, notably older people, are now diagnosed with high blood pressure, or hypertension. This may sound like bad news, but the new guidelines highlight some important lessons we cardiologists and heart health researchers have learned from the latest blood pressure studies. Specifically, we have learned that damage […]

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People more likely to trust, cooperate if they can tolerate ambiguity, study finds

Can a new colleague be trusted with confidential information? Will she be a cooperative team player on a critical upcoming project? Assessing someone’s motives or intentions, which are often hidden, is difficult, and gauging how to behave toward others involves weighing possible outcomes and personal consequences. New research published in Nature Communications indicates that individuals who are tolerant of ambiguity—a […]

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At-risk adolescents are less likely to express depression on social media as they age

Findings from a new study reveal at-risk adolescents are less likely to post about depressive symptoms on social media as they age. The research suggests that adolescents with a diagnosis of depression may feel less stigmatized describing depressed mood on social media than previously hypothesized. The research will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting in Toronto. […]

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