Ancient viruses could help kill cancers

DNA “echoes” of viruses that infected our ancestors millions of years ago could help the immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, according to new research from Crick scientists. The new study, published in Genome Research, looked at “endogenous retroviruses,” fragments of DNA in the human genome that were left behind by viruses that infected our ancestors. Over millions […]

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How can more walking be encouraged in cities?

A report investigating travel habits in seven European cities reveals environmental and social drivers that make people choose to walk. The new research reveals these include social factors such as how safe people feel and how concerned they are about air pollution, and urban design, such as how connected streets are and how close people are to public transport links. […]

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Novel regulator of mitochondrial cell death reveals a promising target for cancer therapy

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have described the role of mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) in controlling survival of cancer cells, suggesting the protein could represent a promising therapeutic target. They also found that expression of MFF is regulated by Myc, a ubiquitous mediator of cell proliferation that contributes to development of many cancer types. These results were published online in […]

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Certain genetic variants predispose patients with diabetes to kidney disease

In an unprecedented scale, researchers have begun to unravel the genetics that may predispose some individuals to develop kidney disease once they have diabetes, independent of the degree of blood sugar control. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of JASN. Many individuals with type 1 diabetes develop kidney disease despite adequate blood sugar control, while others maintain normal kidney […]

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How Does a Creative Brain Work?

There is a common perception that the right-side of our brain is responsible for logic and analysis, while the left side is responsible for innovation and creativity. An extension of this understanding states that those who think more with the right side of their brains are more logical and have greater analytical skills, while those who are more inclined towards […]

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For gut microbes, not all types of fiber are created equal

Certain human gut microbes with links to health thrive when fed specific types of ingredients in dietary fibers, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The work—conducted in mice colonized with human gut bacteria and using new technologies for measuring nutrient processing—is a step toward developing more nutritious foods based on a strategy […]

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Persistent headache or back pain ‘twice as likely’ in the presence of the other

People with persistent back pain or persistent headaches are twice as likely to suffer from both disorders, a new study from the University of Warwick has revealed. The results, published in the Journal of Headache and Pain, suggest an association between the two types of pain that could point to a shared treatment for both. The researchers from Warwick Medical […]

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Researchers find new ways to improve CPR

An international research consortium, which included faculty members from the University of Minnesota Medical School, was able to identify what is likely an optimal combination of chest compression frequency and depth when performing CPR. The investigation was led by Sue Duval, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicine and Biostatistics at the U of M Medical School, assisted by an international team […]

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Q&A: Mild hypothyroidism may not need treatment

Dear Mayo Clinic: I recently was diagnosed with mild hypothyroidism that isn’t causing symptoms. My doctor says I don’t need treatment now, but she wants me to come back for regular checkups. Does hypothyroidism usually get worse over time? If it does, how is it treated? A: For mild cases of hypothyroidism, not all patients need treatment. Occasionally, the condition […]

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Three faces of teen popularity: being feared, being loved, and being feared and loved

Adolescents place a lot of emphasis on popularity and they are keenly aware of the difference between being liked and being popular. If forced to choose, many opt for popularity. Popularity, however, has many faces. In prior research, two groups of popular adolescents stand out: those who are aggressive and those who are prosocial. Prosocial popular teens acquire and maintain […]

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