More aggressive statin tx needed after heart attack in young patients

(HealthDay)—The majority of young heart attack patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) still have elevated cholesterol levels a year later, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Avinainder Singh, M.D., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues used data from the YOUNG-MI registry to assess the prevalence […]

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Deadly tick-borne virus cured with experimental flu drug, in mice

Only a few cases of the newly discovered Bourbon virus have been reported, and two of them ended in death, partly because no specific treatments are available for the tick-borne illness. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified an experimental antiviral drug that cures mice infected with the potentially lethal virus. The drug, favipiravir, […]

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Mathematical tools to study tumors

Researchers from the Department of Cellular Biology at the University of Seville and the Seville Institute of Biomedicine (IBiS), Pablo Vicente and Doctor Luisma Escudero, in close collaboration with the researcher Rebecca Burgos and other members of the group of Doctor Rosa Noguera (University of Valencia—INCLIVA, CIBERONC) have published a study aimed at developing new therapies to fight childhood cancer. […]

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Viral strains that cause ‘stomach flu’ don’t all look alike

Stomach bugs come in different sizes. Norovirus, best known for sweeping through daycares and cruise ships, can form small, medium, and large structures depending on the viral strain. The discovery, reported June 10, 2019, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, overturns nearly two decades of conventional wisdom about norovirus. Until now, the only structural data about […]

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Trauma-focused therapy may hold key to reducing women’s offending

Women prisoners might benefit from female-specific treatment that addresses the traumas common among women. A new report, launched at the Houses of Parliament today, analyzes the benefits of the Healing Trauma intervention programme currently running in eight of the UK’s 12 women’s prisons. The report outlines how trauma such as sexual assault, sexual abuse and domestic abuse, which affect mostly […]

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Global burden of mental health in conflict settings

People living in countries that have experienced armed conflict are five times more likely to develop anxiety or depression, a University of Queensland research collaboration has found. UQ School of Public Health researcher Dr. Fiona J Charlson said the study, conducted with the World Health Organisation (WHO) and University of Washington, highlighted the serious effects of war on mental health. […]

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Genetic marker linked to increased risk of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Researchers from Joslin Diabetes Center, using a genome-wide association study, have identified a genetic factor linked to the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This finding suggests a new target for preventive therapies. The research has been published online and will appear in the August print issue of Diabetes. While neuropathy, which causes pain or numbness in the legs and an […]

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Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy

A University of Houston engineer is reporting in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons, called the local field potential. Professor of biomedical engineering Joe Francis reports his team’s findings allow for the development […]

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