Researchers 3-D bio-print a model that could lead to improved anticancer drugs and treatments

University of Minnesota researchers have developed a way to study cancer cells which could lead to new and improved treatment. They have developed a new way to study these cells in a 3-D in vitro model (i.e. in a culture dish rather than in a human or animal). In a paper recently published in Advanced Materials, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Ph.D., Vice […]

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Discovery of enhanced bone growth could lead to new treatments for osteoporosis

UCLA and UC San Francisco life scientists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice—research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women. The researchers found that blocking a particular set of signals from a small number of neurons in the brain causes female, but not male, […]

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Treatments for preeclampsia

Researchers at ETH Zurich have used trials with mice to shed light on signalling pathways that lead to thickened and less elastic blood vessels. They have developed a treatment approach for pregnant women with previously untreatable preeclampsia. One in 20 women around the world suffers from preeclampsia during pregnancy. It causes a rise in blood pressure and the kidneys cease […]

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Insulin discovery a game-changer for improving diabetes treatments

An international collaboration co-led by researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has made a discovery that could make therapeutic insulins more effective by better mimicking the way insulin works in the body. The findings could improve treatments for diabetes, a disease that impacts the lives of millions of people worldwide. Published today in Nature Communications, the study reveals […]

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New stem cell model can be used to test treatments for a rare nervous system disorder

A City of Hope researcher has developed a stem cell model to assess possible treatments for a rare nervous system disorder that is in the same disease group as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The finding takes Yanhong Shi, Ph.D., senior author of the study, and her colleagues one step closer to finding a way to […]

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Newly characterized molecule offers possibilities for novel Alzheimer’s treatments

Alzheimer’s disease is an increasingly prevalent, neurodegenerative condition that erodes memory and other cognitive functions. Treatments for this complex disease have been elusive, although researchers have previously uncovered its main biological features: amyloid-beta plaques and tau tangles. A study by researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), recently published in Acta Neuropathologica, investigated lesser-known molecules involved in tauopathies like Alzheimer’s. […]

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Traumatic brain injury: Discovery of two molecules could lead to new drug treatments

After 10 years of research, a Rutgers-led team of scientists has identified two molecules that protect nerve cells after a traumatic brain injury and could lead to new drug treatments. The molecules promote full recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice, according to the study published online in Neurobiology of Disease. Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of […]

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Experimental MERS treatments enter clinical trial

Enrollment has begun in an early-stage clinical trial testing the safety of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) designed to treat people infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). The trial is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and is funded in part by the Biomedical Advanced Research […]

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‘Lone wolf’ protein offers new pathway to cancer treatments

Structural biologists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered how a key protein functions to trigger cell’s suicide machinery, called apoptosis. The scientists found that the protein, called BOK, is controlled separately from the rest of the apoptosis process—offering the potential for new drugs to more selectively kill cancer cells. Led by Tudor Moldoveanu, Ph.D., an assistant member of […]

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