Interaction between two immune cell types could be key to better dengue vaccines, study shows

Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School have demonstrated for the first time a physical interaction between two types of immune cells that plays an important role in the early fight against dengue virus infection. Dengue virus is widespread in the tropics and is transmitted by mosquitos. Dengue virus infection incidence has grown dramatically in recent years, with estimates suggesting 390 million […]

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Research shows how service dogs can help veterans with PTSD

For veterans struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder, service dogs might be able to offer both behavioral and physiological benefits to help counter some of those symptoms, according to research that is being led by the Purdue College of Veterinary Medicine. Maggie O’Haire, assistant professor of human-animal interaction in the College of Veterinary Medicine, is at the forefront of the research […]

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Innovation in health education helping children ride ups and downs of life, study shows

A new study by the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) into work going on in Gloucestershire schools shows that young people are becoming more responsible for looking after their own health. Facts4Life is one of a suite of health and wellbeing programmes and interventions being delivered in Gloucestershire schools. The programme, run by a GP and a […]

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Research shows signalling mechanism in the brain shapes social aggression

Duke-NUS researchers have discovered that a growth factor protein, called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) affects social dominance in mice. The research has implications for understanding the neurobiology of aggression and bullying. “Humans and rodents are social animals. Our every interaction follows rules according to a social hierarchy. Failure to navigate this hierarchy […]

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Research shows it’s possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells

What’s the secret to aging well? University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have answered it- on a cellular level. Aging starts in our cells, and those aging cells can hasten cellular senescence, leading to tissue dysfunction and related health impacts. New research involving University of Minnesota Medical School faculty Paul D. Robbins and Laura J. Niedernhofer, recently published in Nature […]

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Half of female students experience psychological distress, study shows

For the first time, just over 50 per cent of female students in Ontario show signs of moderate to serious psychological distress, according to the latest Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS), released by Toronto’s Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). Psychological distress—which refers to symptoms of anxiety or depression—has been rising steadily among all Ontario students […]

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