The most stunning celebrity nurseries

Whether or not you have had babies yourself, you know that a lot of thought goes into planning, designing, and building the nursery before the little one comes along. Even if you haven’t talked to the momma-to-be about it specifically, you can get a pretty good sense of the theme of the nursery just by browsing through her baby registry […]

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Six tips to spot cancer ‘fake news’

Cancer is a popular topic for the media, as people care and worry about it in equal measure. News reports help people find out what researchers are working on, and how charitable donations are being spent. They also helps generate interest in the amazing science going on. But perhaps most of all, health stories and clinical trial results have a […]

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Researchers identify the electrophysiological sign of cerebral infarction

Researchers have analyzed the underlying electrophysiological indicators of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the second most common type of brain hemorrhage that can lead to ischemic stroke within a matter of days. Their findings, which have been published in the journal Brain, may lay the foundations for new stroke treatments. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a type of brain bleed that occurs in the area […]

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The Impact of Marriage on Physical Health

Marriage is viewed as simply a bond between two people who choose to spend their lives together (or at least most part of it). However, recent studies have shown how getting married may also have a positive impact on your physical health. Many recent studies have indicated how getting married can have a positive impact on our overall health Prevents […]

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Thirsty mosquitoes may bite more in droughts

(HealthDay)—Your blood mght be a thirst quencher for mosquitoes during a drought. A new study found that while female mosquitoes need the protein in blood to lay eggs, they also bite you to stay hydrated. According to the research team from the University of Cincinnati, learning more about how often these insects need to drink blood in dry conditions could […]

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First 3D-printed human corneas

The first human corneas have been 3-D printed by scientists at Newcastle University, UK. It means the technique could be used in the future to ensure an unlimited supply of corneas. As the outermost layer of the human eye, the cornea has an important role in focusing vision. Yet there is a significant shortage of corneas available to transplant, with […]

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Researchers magnify the brain in motion with every heartbeat

Understanding how the brain moves—at rest and upon impact—has been crucial to understanding brain disorders, but technology to clearly see these movements has lagged behind. Now, researchers from Stevens Institute of Technology, in collaboration with University of Auckland and Stanford University, have developed an imaging technique that captures and magnifies the brain in motion, in real time, every time the […]

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WIC participation better among vulnerable, US citizen children whose mothers are eligible for DACA

Results of a study of nearly 2,000 U.S. citizen children and their mothers add to growing evidence of the multigenerational, beneficial effects of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy on children who are citizens, illustrating increased participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) among citizen children whose mothers are likely eligible […]

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