Specialist technique used to study drugs completed for first time during Ebola outbreak

A specialist technique used to study drugs has been completed for the first time during an outbreak of Ebola virus disease. The study published today in eBiomedicine was a collaboration of researchers from Sierra Leone and the University’s of Glasgow, Oxford, Cambridge and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. It used pharmacokinetics—the measurement of the change in drug concentration in […]

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New study finds evidence for reduced brain connections in schizophrenia

Advances in scanning have allowed researchers for the first time to show lower levels of a protein found in the connections between neurons in the living brains of people with schizophrenia. The researchers, who conducted the scans at the psychiatric imaging facility at the Medical Research Council (MRC) London Institute of Medical Sciences, say these changes could underlie the cognitive […]

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Long-term memory performance depends upon gating system, study finds

Storing and retrieving memories is among the most important tasks our intricate brains must perform, yet how that happens at a molecular level remains incompletely understood. A new study from the lab of Neuroscience Professor Ronald Davis, Ph.D., at Scripps Research, Florida, sheds light on one element of that memory storage process, namely the storage and retrieval of a type […]

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Study finds potential new treatment for preventing PTSD

Research led by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation points to a groundbreaking discovery about a new potential treatment and prevention for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The research team, led by Dr. Fang Liu, Senior Scientist and Head of Molecular Neuroscience in CAMH’s Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, and Professor […]

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Study: Hearing develops in tandem with form and function

New research reveals a key insight into the development of hair bundles, the intricately complex assemblies in the inner ear responsible for hearing. Hair bundles are precisely arranged cellular structures deep within the spiral cavity of the inner ear. Together, they convert vibrational energy into electrical signals in the brain that translate into the sensation of hearing. Once they’re lost—whether […]

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Study: Obesity could affect brain development in children

Published studies have long found a correlation between obesity in children and decreased executive function. New research published in JAMA Pediatrics, based on data mined from a massive national research study, suggests that a change in brain structure—a thinner prefrontal cortex—may help explain that interrelationship. “Our results show an important connection; that kids with higher BMI tend to have a […]

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Rates of depression and substance use higher for pregnant teens, study finds

Researchers from Lawson Health Research Institute and Brescia University College found that teenage pregnant women are more likely to live in poverty, have poorer mental health and have higher rates of substance use. There are limited Canadian studies on teenage pregnancies, in particular looking at risk factors and birth outcomes compared to women who became pregnant during adulthood. London researchers […]

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Disruption of glycine receptors to study embryonic development and brain function

Glycine receptors are among the most widely distributed inhibitory receptors in the central nervous system and have important roles in a variety of physiological processes. Researchers from Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI), University of Toyama, Yamagata University, Cairo University, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences and Setsunan University collaborated to study glycine receptors, particularly glycine receptor alpha-4 (Glra4), […]

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Study examines causes of death in US breast cancer survivors

Survival rates for patients with breast cancer have improved significantly in the last four decades, and many patients will eventually die from non-cancer-related causes. Researchers recently conducted the largest population-based long-term retrospective analysis of non-cancer causes of death among patients with breast cancer. The findings are published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. Of […]

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