Scientists reveal novel oncogenic driver gene in human gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Sarcomas—cancers that arise from transformed mesenchymal cells (a type of connective tissue)—are quite deadly. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common human sarcoma and are initiated by activating mutations in the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase. Micro-GISTs are a smaller variation of clinical GISTs and are found in one-third of the general population without clinical symptoms. Although the micro-GISTs and […]

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15 Mothers Reveal What Mom Burnout Really Looks Like

In the 1970s, psychologist Herbert Freudenberger coined the word “burnout” to mean “a state of mental and physical exhaustion caused by one’s professional life.” According to Freudenberger, burnout isn’t a mental illness; rather, it’s a stress state characterized by symptoms such as fatigue, irritability and insomnia. And recent research suggests that parents can succumb to burnout. In fact, low to moderate correlations […]

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A call to neuroscientists to help reveal root causes of chemobrain

A substantial fraction of non-central nervous system cancer survivors, especially those who have received chemotherapy, experience long-lasting cognitive difficulties, including problems with concentration, word-finding, short-term memory, and multitasking. Though well documented, cancer-related cognitive impairment (CRCI), known colloquially as chemobrain or chemofog, remains a mystery regarding its underlying neurological causes. In a Forum paper published June 12 in the journal Trends […]

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Scientists reveal likely cause of childhood leukaemia

A major new analysis reveals for the first time the likely cause of most cases of childhood leukaemia, following more than a century of controversy about its origins. Professor Mel Greaves from The Institute of Cancer Research, London, assessed the most comprehensive body of evidence ever collected on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) – the most common type of childhood cancer. […]

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Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease

New research has found that poorer well-being or ‘health-related quality of life’ (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research found that adolescents with poorer scores in the social and mental well-being domains of HRQoL have structural changes in their retinal blood vessels that could be associated with […]

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