New technique predicts which melanoma patients are at risk for cancer recurrence, spread

For most patients, melanoma begins with a small, pigmented spot on their skin that they notice starts to change. Many primary melanomas can be cured by having this lesion removed, but melanoma can also recur and spread; an analysis of the removed lesion can offer some information on the likelihood that the cancer will come back. Today, lesions are analyzed […]

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Obesity is a risk factor for cardiotoxicity in chemotherapy-treated patients with breast cancer

Anthracyclines remain a cornerstone of breast cancer therapy in combination with new-generation targeted drugs such as trastuzumab. Both types of drugs are major culprits in chemotherapy-induced heart disease. A recent study showed that being overweight or obese was a risk factor for cardiotoxicity in chemotherapy-treated patients with breast cancer, but it did not take into account related cardiac risk factors […]

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Researchers turn to Yelp reviews to learn how patients with addiction rate their treatment

As the opioid crisis has worsened, addiction treatment programs have proliferated—but there’s no standardized way to rate those programs, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania note in a new study. So they turned to Yelp. The popular online review site is best-known for its restaurant ratings. But it’s also become a clearinghouse for people to rate just about anything—including addiction […]

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Healthy diet may avert nutritional problems in head, neck cancer patients

At least 90 percent of head and neck cancer patients develop symptoms that affect their ability or desire to eat, because of either the tumor itself or the surgery or radiation used to treat it. These problems, called nutrition impact symptoms, have wide-ranging negative effects on patients’ physical and mental health and quality of life. However, patients who eat foods […]

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Targeted therapy better for repeat kidney cancer patients than FDA-approved counterpart

Kidney cancer patients who had already tried two or three different treatments had improved chances of preventing cancer progression with an experimental drug called tivozanib compared to an alternative approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to a City of Hope-led study. “This agent has shown in clinical trials to be effective in delaying cancer growth beyond established […]

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Autism-related genetic mutations occur in aging brains of Alzheimer’s patients

Researchers believe that autism is caused by mutations that occur sporadically in the egg or sperm or during pregnancy. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a dominant gene whose de novo (during pregnancy) mutations are known to cause autism-related intellectual disabilities. A new Tel Aviv University study has found that ADNP mutations continue to occur in old age and accumulate in […]

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Intermittent fasting increases longevity in cardiac catheterization patients

While Intermittent fasting may sound like another dieting craze, the practice of routinely not eating and drinking for short periods of time has shown again to lead to potentially better health outcomes. In a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have found that cardiac catheterization patients who practiced regular intermittent fasting […]

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Wearable and implantable devices may transform care for patients with kidney failure

A feature article appearing in an upcoming issue of CJASN highlights the potential of wearable and implantable devices for treating kidney failure. In their feature article, Shuvo Roy, Ph.D. (University of California, San Francisco) and his colleagues note that traditional hemodialysis performed in clinics has a number of shortcomings, with patients reporting burdens related to fatigue, poor sleep, inability to […]

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New way of measuring white blood cell function offers better insights to help patients with sepsis

Caring for a patient with sepsis requires walking a treatment tightrope. Clinicians must identify the pathogen that is causing a patient’s infection, carefully monitor the patient’s response to antibiotics and supportive measures and race against the clock to prevent potential organ failure and death. Most of the time, physicians can control the infection itself. What ultimately leads to multi-organ system […]

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Opioid-related cardiac arrest patients differ from other cardiac arrests

One recent study found that opioid overdose victims who suffer cardiac arrest are distinctly different from other cardiac arrest patients, yet they may be more likely than others to survive long enough to be admitted to a hospital, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019—November 16-17 in Philadelphia. “Cardiac arrests due […]

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