Calculated surprise leads to groundbreaking discovery in cognitive control research

Humans control their behavior in numerous ways, from stopping the urge pick at a scab to resisting the impulse to eat an entire box of chocolates. Suppressing undesired behavior, referred to as “cognitive control,” traditionally has been linked to the functioning of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in the front of the brain. Activity in dACC is observed across […]

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CRISPR-Cas9 datasets analysis leads to largest genetic screen resource for cancer research

A comprehensive map of genes necessary for cancer survival is one step closer, following the validation of the two largest CRISPR-Cas9 genetic screens in 725 cancer models, across 25 different cancer types. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard compared the consistency of the two datasets, independently verifying the methodology and findings. The […]

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Novel approach leads to potential sepsis prevention in burn patients

Immediately following severe burns, bacteria reach the wound from different sources, including the patient’s skin, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tracts and health care-related human contact. Within the wound, bacteria multiply, establish an infection and move from the infected burn wound into the bloodstream, causing serious complications like sepsis, multiple-organ failure and death. In modern burn units, more than 50% of deaths […]

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New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease

Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis—deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide. “We have known for decades that atherosclerosis is a disease of […]

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Infant colic leads to no ongoing problems, study shows

Colicky babies whose crying eases within three months have no ongoing behavioural problems according to new research by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI). In welcome reassurance to concerned parents, MCRI-funded research conducted by Royal Children’s Hospital paediatrician Dr. Georgie Bell found that crying and stress related to the common infant condition is short-lived and will likely resolve. Infant colic […]

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Elevated HbA1c usually leads to prompt Tx start, intensification

(HealthDay)—Most patients are newly initiated on antidiabetic therapy or have antidiabetic therapy intensified within six months of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) elevation, according to a study published online May 24 in Diabetes Care. Lauren G. Gilstrap, M.D., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues used data from 2008 to 2015 commercial claims linked with laboratory and pharmacy data to create […]

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Learning music or speaking another language leads to more efficient brains

Whether you learn to play a musical instrument or speak another language, you’re training your brain to be more efficient, suggests a Baycrest study. Researchers found that musicians and people who are bilingual utilized fewer brain resources when completing a working memory task, according to recently published findings in the journal, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Individuals […]

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For stroke victims, brain magnetic stimulation leads to improved walking speed

A technique of magnetic stimulation of the brain can increase walking speed in patients who are undergoing rehabilitation after a stroke, reports a research update in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. Noninvasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) – especially high-frequency stimulation on the same side of the brain […]

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Injecting gene cocktail into mouse pancreas leads to humanlike tumors

Novel technology developed at UT Health San Antonio gives rise to mouse pancreatic tumors that have the same traits as human pancreatic cancer. A U.S. patent is pending on the invention. The technology could revolutionize studies of pancreatic cancer initiation and progression and spur new drug development. An article published in the journal Carcinogenesis (Oxford University Press) describes this unique […]

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