Does that medicine work for women? Why signing up for a medical study could be your next feminist move

You’ve marched in the Women’s March, cheered for women in Congress, grappled with the wide-ranging implications of the MeToo movement, talked with your kids (of both genders) about sexual harassment. Wait—did you forget to sign up for a medical study? In the new pantheon of Women’s Causes We Care About, inclusion in medical research has often ranked somewhere below concern […]

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As work gets more ambiguous, younger generations may be less equipped for it

We work in a world of increasing ambiguity. Over the past few decades technological change and globalisation have fundamentally changed the nature of the “average” job. There is greater competition and higher expectations. We face more situations, projects, tasks or objectives that are new, different, unclear or inexact. To investigate whether Australian workers are equipped to handle this growing ambiguity […]

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How environmental pollutants and genetics work together in rheumatoid arthritis

It has been known for more than three decades that individuals with a particular version of a gene—human leukocyte antigen (HLA)—have an increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis. Meanwhile, in recent years, there has been a growing interest in the relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and environmental factors, such as cigarette smoking. In smokers who develop rheumatoid arthritis, the disease hits harder. […]

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When others fail, new migraine treatment may work

People who have tried unsuccessfully to prevent migraine with other treatments may find relief with a drug called erenumab, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. Migraine, which can be debilitating, is often very difficult to treat. As the […]

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