Double whammy for grieving spouses with sleep problems

Sleep disturbances have a strong negative impact on the immune system of people who have recently lost a spouse, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and Rice University. The overactivated immune system of the bereaved triggered by sleep disturbances—and resulting chronic inflammation—may make them more susceptible to heart disease or cancer, the study authors said. Grieving spouses have a […]

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Research shows how service dogs can help veterans with PTSD

For veterans struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder, service dogs might be able to offer both behavioral and physiological benefits to help counter some of those symptoms, according to research that is being led by the Purdue College of Veterinary Medicine. Maggie O’Haire, assistant professor of human-animal interaction in the College of Veterinary Medicine, is at the forefront of the research […]

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Complication of broken heart syndrome associated with both short- and long-term risk of death

When patients with broken heart syndrome survive a life-threatening complication that renders the heart suddenly unable to pump enough blood, they remain at greater risk of death for years afterwards, according to research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018. The study will also be simultaneously published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. […]

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Long-term prognosis of Chagas patients improved with anti-parasite drug

Researchers have found that the anti-parasite drug benznidazole may improve the long-term prognoses of patients with chronic Chagas disease, according to a study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, by Clareci Silva Cardoso at the Federal University of São João del-Rei, Divinópolis, Brazil, and colleagues from the SaMi-Trop study, a project funded by NIAID/NIH. Caused by exposure to the protozoa […]

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Stanford, Apple describe heart study with over 400,000 participants

A clinical trial to determine whether a smartwatch app that analyzes pulse-rate data can screen for a heart-rhythm disorder has enrolled more than 400,000 participants. Researchers at Stanford Medicine, in collaboration with Apple, launched the Apple Heart Study last November to determine whether a mobile app that uses the optical sensor on the Apple Watch to analyze pulse rate data […]

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Study links cottonseed oil with lower cholesterol

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that a high-fat diet enriched with cottonseed oil drastically improved cholesterol profiles in young adult men. The researchers conducted a five-day outpatient feeding trial of 15 healthy, normal weight men to test the effects of diets enriched with cottonseed oil and olive oil on lipid profiles. Participants showed significant reductions in cholesterol […]

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Behavioral risk factors for depression vary with age, study finds

Behavioral risk factors including smoking, obesity, limited physical activity and a less healthy diet strongly predict the likelihood of depression—and that likelihood increases with each additional risk factor a person possesses. Additionally, the risk factors most strongly linked to depression change with age. Previous studies had identified behavioral risk factors for depression, but it was unclear how these variables changed […]

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Millions with high blood sugar face TB risk

Millions of people with high blood sugar may be at greater risk of tuberculosis than previously thought, scientists said Friday, warning that diabetes and TB could combine to create the “perfect storm” of disease. Tuberculosis, a severe infection caused by bacteria in the lungs, kills almost as many people each year as HIV/AIDS and malaria combined. In 2017 nearly 10 […]

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Obesity problem starts early phase of therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Children with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) gain weight during treatment, and researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered that this problem starts during remission-induction treatment and suggests that early intervention should be considered. Chemotherapy drugs to treat ALL contribute to myriad problems, one of which is an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese. And because patients […]

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