Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety

Caring for family members with dementia—which is on the rise in the U.S.—causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers’ risk of depression, anxiety and death. A new method of coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks, reports a new national Northwestern Medicine study. It […]

Continue reading »

Scientists discover how superbugs hide from their host

New research led by the University of Sheffield has discovered how a hospital superbug evades the immune system to cause infection – paving the way for new treatments. The study, led by the University of Sheffield’s Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, investigated how Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), bacteria commonly found in the digestive tracts of humans, cause life-threatening infections. […]

Continue reading »

Researchers aiming to cure spina bifida get a step closer to their goal

Researchers on the path to finding a cure for spina bifida have identified specific elements in stem cell secretions as key to protecting neurons and ultimately reducing the lower-limb paralysis associated with the birth defect. Those elements are exosomes—vesicles that transfer molecules from cell to cell—and a small carbohydrate-binding protein known as galectin 1. The team will use the results […]

Continue reading »

People with boring jobs tend to design dull jobs for their colleagues

Managers and professional employees who have boring and dull jobs themselves are more likely to design demotivating, disengaging, low-skill and repetitive jobs for others, new research led by Curtin University has found. The research, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, examined how individuals, including managers and professionals, make decisions that influence other people’s quality of work. Lead author ARC […]

Continue reading »

Mental health claimants more than twice as likely to lose their benefit as non-psychiatric claimants

People who are mentally ill are 2.4 times more likely than claimants with non-psychiatric conditions to lose their existing benefit following a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) eligibility assessment, research has found. Published in the British Journal of Psychiatry Open, the study from the University of York analysed government data of claimants moving from an existing Disability Living Allowance (DLA) entitlement […]

Continue reading »

Breast cancer screening: New emphasis on shared decision-making between women and their doctors

An updated guideline on screening for breast cancer emphasizes shared decision-making between women and their doctors, supporting women to make an informed decision based on personal preferences when the balance between benefits and harms is uncertain. The guideline, released by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Based on the latest […]

Continue reading »
1 2 3