Calcifications in the eye increase risk for progression to advanced AMD by more than six times

Calcified nodules in the retina are associated with progression to late stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Experts from Queen’s University Belfast, working in partnership with the University of Alabama of Birmingham and in collaboration with UK material scientists and US clinical ophthalmology practices, made the ground-breaking discovery that the calcified nodules in the retina – the thin layer of […]

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Standing in for a kidney, MXene materials could give dialysis patients the freedom to move

For more than 3 million people around the world, kidney failure is a life-altering diagnosis, if not a life-threatening one. While about 17 percent of people in the U.S. with end-stage kidney disease are now getting transplants, the average time spent waiting is 3-5 years. And much of that time is consumed by planning for, receiving and recovering from treatment. […]

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Grandparents: Raising their children’s children, they get the job done

Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families. New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2018 National Conference & Exhibition shows that caregivers who step up to raise their grandchildren are overcoming unique challenges to manage just as well as […]

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Using the microbiome to help premature babies grow

About half of babies born prematurely struggle to grow, putting them at risk of health problems that can last a lifetime. Despite years of research, physicians lack a method that consistently helps these infants thrive. A study suggests that the gut microbiome – the trillions of tiny bacteria that live in the digestive tract – could help doctors personalize nutrients […]

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What is the virus that has killed 7 children in New Jersey?

(HealthDay)—New Jersey health officials on Wednesday confirmed the deaths of seven children following infection with an adenovirus—a member of the same viral family that causes the common cold. Eleven other children are infected, and all cases occurred at the same health care facility, the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, according to N.J. Commissioner of Health Dr. Shereef […]

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The reward system in the brain affects our judgments

We make judgements quite rationally or “by the gut.” Not only experience and relevant information play an important role, but also our preferences. A study by the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research in Cologne shows how the reward system in the brain conveys judgements affected by one’s own desires. “In complex, confusing situations, we run the risk of making […]

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Journalism study evaluates emotions on the job

A QUT journalism academic says the current freelancer-heavy market for media professionals could be preventing photographers and video journalists who report on traumatic news events from accessing the support they need. The results of TJ Thomson’s peer-reviewed study Mapping the emotional labor and work of visual journalism has been published in Journalism. “People understand exposure to media content impacts audiences […]

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The Mom's Guide to Madrid

One of my favorite European cities for food, fashion and fun is Madrid. While living in Morocco, I’d plan overnight layovers in Spain’s capital when flying to and from the U.S. Last summer, I stayed longer, and with the help of Devour Madrid and my Spanish friend Moni discovered even more family vacation options. Where to eat Pin Image: Courtesy […]

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