Treating a rare genetic disorder that causes colon cancer in children

A University of Houston pharmaceutical scientist is developing a new drug which could bring relief to children suffering with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), a rare genetic disorder characterized by hundreds—if not thousands—of colorectal polyps. This hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome occurs in 3-per-100,000 live births and, if left untreated, causes colorectal cancer in patients nearly 100 percent of the time. Prior […]

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Encouraging more health workers to have flu jab needs new approach that connects on an emotional level

Persuading more health workers to have the flu jab to protect themselves and their patients cannot be done through facts and statistics alone, new research by a leading behavioural scientist from Kingston University has revealed. Instead it demands a new approach that connects with people emotionally to sustain immunisation rates at effective levels. Nearly one third of nurses, GPs and […]

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Serotonin neurons contribute to fail-safe mechanism that ensures recovery from interrupted breathing

Scientists trying to identify the roots of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of death in U.S. infants between 1 month and 1 year old, have increasingly turned their attention to the neurotransmitter serotonin and the brain cells that produce it. Studies have linked serotonin-producing neurons to the regulation of breathing, which may go awry in SIDS. In […]

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What is the virus that has killed 7 children in New Jersey?

(HealthDay)—New Jersey health officials on Wednesday confirmed the deaths of seven children following infection with an adenovirus—a member of the same viral family that causes the common cold. Eleven other children are infected, and all cases occurred at the same health care facility, the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, according to N.J. Commissioner of Health Dr. Shereef […]

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Bug that causes stomach cancer could play a role in colorectal cancer

A bacterium known for causing stomach cancer might also increase the risk of certain colorectal cancers, particularly among African Americans, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers. The finding, published online Oct. 5 in the journal Gastroenterology, describes an association between antibodies to H. pylori bacteria and an increased risk of colorectal cancers, although it does not […]

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Mouse study mirrors human findings that link chemotherapy and APOE4 to cognitive issues

The research, led by Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) investigators and published in Neurotoxicity Research, complements findings from another GUMC-led study, published Oct. 3, that found a subset of breast cancer patients who experience long lasting cognitive deficits also have the APOE4 gene. Cancer survivors often report memory difficulties and this study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO), […]

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Study finds that enzymes ‘partner up’ to accelerate cancer, aging diseases

A new study from molecular biologists at Indiana University has identified cellular processes that appear to supercharge both the growth and shrinkage of the chemical “caps” on chromosomes associated with aging, called telomeres. The work, focused on two enzymes in yeast, could lead to new insights on stopping runaway cellular growth in cancer tumors, as well as the treatment of […]

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A behavioral intervention for cancer patients that works

This is a story about something rare in health psychology: a treatment that has gone from scientific discovery, through development and testing, to dissemination and successful implementation nationwide. In a new study, researchers found that a program designed at The Ohio State University to reduce harmful stress in cancer patients can be taught to therapists from around the country and […]

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