Double whammy for grieving spouses with sleep problems

Sleep disturbances have a strong negative impact on the immune system of people who have recently lost a spouse, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and Rice University. The overactivated immune system of the bereaved triggered by sleep disturbances—and resulting chronic inflammation—may make them more susceptible to heart disease or cancer, the study authors said. Grieving spouses have a […]

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‘Prevalence induced concept change’ causes people to re-define problems as they are reduced, study says

Although it’s far from perfect by virtually any measure—whether poverty rates, violence, access to education, racism and prejudice or any number of others—the world continues to improve. Why, then, do polls consistently show that people believe otherwise? The answer, Daniel Gilbert says, may lie in a phenomenon called “prevalence induced concept change.” As demonstrated in a series of new studies, […]

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Infant colic leads to no ongoing problems, study shows

Colicky babies whose crying eases within three months have no ongoing behavioural problems according to new research by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI). In welcome reassurance to concerned parents, MCRI-funded research conducted by Royal Children’s Hospital paediatrician Dr. Georgie Bell found that crying and stress related to the common infant condition is short-lived and will likely resolve. Infant colic […]

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Teachers can help reduce mental health problems in children, study finds

School-based mental health services delivered by teachers and staff can significantly reduce mental health problems in elementary-aged children, according to a new study by researchers at the Florida International University Center for Children and Families. The implications are significant considering approximately 30 to 40 percent of youth in the U.S. will be diagnosed with at least one mental health disorder […]

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Early intervention may minimise later lung problems

A major study has found that controlling asthma through appropriate monitoring and medication is among several variables that can affect whether someone develops chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in later life. The University of Melbourne-led study, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, was the world’s first to characterise lung function trajectories that could lead to COPD in a large general […]

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