Certain genetic variants predispose patients with diabetes to kidney disease

In an unprecedented scale, researchers have begun to unravel the genetics that may predispose some individuals to develop kidney disease once they have diabetes, independent of the degree of blood sugar control. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of JASN. Many individuals with type 1 diabetes develop kidney disease despite adequate blood sugar control, while others maintain normal kidney […]

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Novel approach leads to potential sepsis prevention in burn patients

Immediately following severe burns, bacteria reach the wound from different sources, including the patient’s skin, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tracts and health care-related human contact. Within the wound, bacteria multiply, establish an infection and move from the infected burn wound into the bloodstream, causing serious complications like sepsis, multiple-organ failure and death. In modern burn units, more than 50% of deaths […]

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Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients

A novel neck brace, which supports the neck during its natural motion, was designed by Columbia engineers. This is the first device shown to dramatically assist patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. This advance would result in improved quality of life for patients, not only in improving […]

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Criteria for bariatric surgery should consider more than just patient’s weight

Experts at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and 45 worldwide scientific and medical societies are pushing to change national guidelines that would allow more patients with the chronic diseases of obesity and diabetes to be eligible for bariatric surgery. Obesity affects almost 40 percent of the population—or about 93 million adults—in the United States, according to the Centers […]

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More aggressive statin tx needed after heart attack in young patients

(HealthDay)—The majority of young heart attack patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) still have elevated cholesterol levels a year later, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Avinainder Singh, M.D., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues used data from the YOUNG-MI registry to assess the prevalence […]

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Guidance updated for sedation in pediatric dental patients

(HealthDay)—In conjunction with the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidance for monitoring and managing pediatric dental patients during sedation; the guidelines were published online May 28 in Pediatrics. Charles J. Coté, M.D., and colleagues from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry present updated guidance on delivering […]

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Patients with diabetes are 40 percent more likely to be readmitted to the hospital

Patients with diabetes and low blood glucose have higher rates of death following hospital discharge, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The cost for hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge is estimated to be close to $25 billion per year in the U.S. Patients with diabetes are frequently admitted to […]

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ICU patients with non-brain-related injuries may suffer undetected cognitive dysfunction

A new study led by Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute has found that most patients entering hospital intensive care units (ICU) for non-brain-related injuries or ailments also suffer from some level of related cognitive dysfunction that currently goes undetected in most cases. The findings were published today in the influential scientific journal, PLOS ONE. Many patients spend time […]

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Studies give new insights on immunotherapy in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC

Two studies to be reported at ELCC 2019 provide new insights on the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), where information has previously been lacking despite being the age group most commonly affected. Immunotherapy with drugs that target immune pathways to enhance the body’s ability to recognise and destroy tumour cells is […]

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