The most important hair on your head is on the inside

Cells along the brain’s cavities are equipped with tiny hair-like protrusions called cilia. Cilia are still poorly understood, but we know a few things about what can happen if they are not doing their job. People with ciliary defects can develop neurological conditions like hydrocephalus and scoliosis. New research from the Yaksi group at Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at […]

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Team develops new eye tests that could help patients and reduce burden on NHS

Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, are leading a cutting-edge project, named the “MONARCH” study, that could benefit eye disease patients whilst saving both time and money within the NHS. The MONARCH study aims to investigate if patients with an eye condition called wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) could test their vision at home, […]

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New study on cognitive archaeology and tactile responses to the lithic industry

The Paleoneurobiology group of the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), led by Emiliano Bruner, has just published, in collaboration with the Museo de la Evolución Humana (MEH) in Burgos and the company Sociograph from Valladolid, a new paper on cognitive archaeology in which the hand-tool relationship is studied, analyzing the geometry of the tools, the grasp […]

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Depression, anxiety may take same toll on health as smoking and obesity

An annual physical typically involves a weight check and questions about unhealthy habits like smoking, but a new study from UC San Francisco suggests health care providers may be overlooking a critical question: Are you depressed or anxious? Anxiety and depression may be leading predictors of conditions ranging from heart disease and high blood pressure to arthritis, headaches, back pain […]

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Breast cancer screening: New emphasis on shared decision-making between women and their doctors

An updated guideline on screening for breast cancer emphasizes shared decision-making between women and their doctors, supporting women to make an informed decision based on personal preferences when the balance between benefits and harms is uncertain. The guideline, released by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Based on the latest […]

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To detect new odors, fruit fly brains improve on a well-known computer algorithm

It might seem like fruit flies would have nothing in common with computers, but new research from the Salk Institute reveals that the two identify novel information in similar ways. The work, which appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on December 3, 2018, not only sheds light on an important neurobiological problem—how organisms detect new odors—but […]

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Reliance on ‘YouTube medicine’ may be dangerous for those concerned about prostate cancer

The most popular YouTube videos on prostate cancer often offer misleading or biased medical information that poses potential health risks to patients, an analysis of the social media platform shows. Led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine and its Perlmutter Cancer Center, the study of the 150 most-viewed YouTube videos on the disease found that 77 percent had factual […]

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Concussion-related biomarkers vary based on sex, race

(HealthDay)—Concussion-related serum biomarkers vary by sex and race, which may complicate their interpretation, according to three studies published online Nov. 7 in Neurology. Breton M. Asken, from the University of Florida in Gainesville, and colleagues conducted an observational cohort study and measured serum concentrations of biomarkers in 415 nonconcussed collegiate athletes without recent exposure to head impacts to describe the […]

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Encouraging more health workers to have flu jab needs new approach that connects on an emotional level

Persuading more health workers to have the flu jab to protect themselves and their patients cannot be done through facts and statistics alone, new research by a leading behavioural scientist from Kingston University has revealed. Instead it demands a new approach that connects with people emotionally to sustain immunisation rates at effective levels. Nearly one third of nurses, GPs and […]

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