As work gets more ambiguous, younger generations may be less equipped for it

We work in a world of increasing ambiguity. Over the past few decades technological change and globalisation have fundamentally changed the nature of the “average” job. There is greater competition and higher expectations. We face more situations, projects, tasks or objectives that are new, different, unclear or inexact. To investigate whether Australian workers are equipped to handle this growing ambiguity […]

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Waiting longer for mental health care may help college students, report finds

As the demand for mental health services among college students nearly doubled over the last decade, advocates championed a common refrain: get students into treatment now. Students, parents and mental health experts feared that a student left untreated might harm themselves or others. Many universities responded by increasing counselors’ caseloads and funneling resources into urgent care. But a report released […]

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New yeast model of metabolic disorders may lead to life-saving therapies

There are hundreds of metabolic disorders—including phenylketonuria, tyrosinemia, maple syrup urine disease and homocystinuria. These disorders lead to congenital diseases that produce a critical enzyme deficiency that interferes with the body’s metabolism. The pathologies and symptoms vary among the diseases, but all of them are usually fatal and have no known cure. Most metabolic disorders affect infants. The majority of […]

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If someone hurt you this year, forgiving them may improve your health (as long as you’re safe, too)

During the end-of-year holidays families often come together to exchange gifts and, sometimes, to confront long-held grudges. What better gift than a peace offering? Conflict is rarely pleasant and arguments in families can be particularly upsetting. We all know that knot in the pit of the stomach, the flushed face and sweaty hands we experience when we feel we have […]

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Depression, anxiety may take same toll on health as smoking and obesity

An annual physical typically involves a weight check and questions about unhealthy habits like smoking, but a new study from UC San Francisco suggests health care providers may be overlooking a critical question: Are you depressed or anxious? Anxiety and depression may be leading predictors of conditions ranging from heart disease and high blood pressure to arthritis, headaches, back pain […]

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Video game players frequently exposed to graphic content may see world differently

People who frequently play violent video games are more immune to disturbing images than non-players, a UNSW-led study into the phenomenon of emotion-induced blindness has shown. The scientists showed that players were better at disregarding graphic content while viewing a rapid series of images, leaving them better able to see what they were asked to look for than non-players. While […]

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Discovery may lead to safer drugs to save more women in childbirth

Postpartum hemorrhaging is the world’s leading cause of death for women during and after childbirth, and the third-leading cause in the United States alone. Many doctors in developing countries have turned to the drug misoprostol to save more women from deadly bleeding. Misoprostol, although affordable, has dangerous side effects, including uterine cramping, heart attack, toxicity in the brain and spinal […]

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