Trauma-focused therapy may hold key to reducing women’s offending

Women prisoners might benefit from female-specific treatment that addresses the traumas common among women. A new report, launched at the Houses of Parliament today, analyzes the benefits of the Healing Trauma intervention programme currently running in eight of the UK’s 12 women’s prisons. The report outlines how trauma such as sexual assault, sexual abuse and domestic abuse, which affect mostly […]

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Parents of depressed teens in treatment may also benefit from counseling

Teen depression can affect parents’ marital satisfaction, a new Northwestern Medicine study has found. Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn’t stop with the depressed teen, suggests the study. The study found that while depressed teens were involved in active treatment, parents’ marriages and parent-child conflict remained stable. Once the teens’ […]

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ACA’s medicaid expansion may have lowered heart disease deaths

(HealthDay)—New research supports the notion that Obamacare has improved the health of Americans: State expansions in Medicaid appear to have cut the number of deaths from heart disease. Counties in states with expanded Medicaid experienced an average of four fewer deaths from heart disease per 100,000 people than states that didn’t accept the expansion under the Affordable Care Act. In […]

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The flu virus’s ability to mutate may sometimes be its downfall

One of influenza virus’s main weapons is actually a double-edged sword. The virus’s ability to rapidly mutate lets it escape from the immune system’s memory and explains why people can be repeatedly re-infected with flu—unlike measles or polio. But those mutations can also blow the virus’s cover, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Jesse Bloom and colleagues reported May 8, 2019, […]

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Closed ICU model may reduce hospital-acquired infections

(HealthDay)—A closed intensive care unit (ICU) model, whereby a patient is evaluated and admitted under an intensivist and orders involving patient care are written by the ICU team, is associated with a reduction in certain types of hospital-acquired infections, according to a study presented at the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference, held from May 17 to 22 in Dallas. […]

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IL-1 inhibitors may reduce radiation-induced vascular damage

Radiation therapy against cancer can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease much later in life, as the radiation causes chronic inflammation of the exposed blood vessels. In a new study published in the European Heart Journal, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have shown that these inflammations can be treated with IL-1 inhibitors. Damage to healthy tissue is one of […]

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Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study

Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable. To help preterm infants make a smooth transition to life outside of the womb, some NICUs have instituted set quiet times to limit children’s exposure to potentially dangerous levels of noise. Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, […]

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Dietary fats entering the brain may explain link between obesity and depression

Obesity and depression have long been linked, with previous clinical studies finding an association between these two conditions. However, until now, the mechanisms of how obesity affects depression and vice versa have not been fully understood. Now, in a new study led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the Gladstone Institutes, and published today in Translational Psychiatry, scientists […]

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