Study reveals how fungal biofilm structure impacts lung disease

Findings from an innovative new study led by researchers at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine and published this week in Nature Microbiology reveal that the way in which human fungal pathogens form colonies can significantly impact their ability to cause disease. Highly diverse and adaptable, these colonies, known as biofilms, allow invasive fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus fumigatus to grow […]

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100-year-old scientific mystery solved: Researchers discover role of nuclear glycogen in non-small cell lung cancers

Researchers at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center have made a breakthrough discovery that solves a mystery long forgotten by science and have identified a potentially novel avenue in pre-clinical models to treat non-small cell lung cancers. Published in Cell Metabolism, the research centers on the function of glycogen accumulation in the nucleus of a cell. Glycogen is known […]

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Building lung capacity, lung-first

The disembodied living lungs in one Yale researcher’s lab show that a standalone bioengineered lung is well along the road to reality. Pneumonia, aspiration, fluid in the lungs, and injuries from mechanical ventilators can severely damage the lungs of people who are critically ill. Transplanted lungs are tragically scarce and beyond the reach of most such patients, including those burdened […]

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Exercise after surgery is important for lung cancer surgery recovery

Lung cancer patients who exercised after the surgery to remove their tumour experienced better fitness levels and strength in their leg muscles as well as less shortness of breath compared to those who did not, new research led by Curtin University has found. The research, published in the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, examined whether exercise training was beneficial for […]

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Inhaled nanoparticles could treat lung cancer

QUT pharmaceutical scientist Dr. Nazrul Islam, from School of Clinical Sciences, said lung cancer was one of the most common cancers globally and one of the deadliest, being a leading cause of cancer deaths. He said chitosan had long been investigated for drug delivery and medical applications. It is made from refined crustacean (prawns, crabs, lobster) shells and was an […]

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A new machine learning model can classify lung cancer slides at the pathologist level

Machine learning has improved dramatically in recent years and shown great promise in the field of medical image analysis. A team of research specialists at Dartmouth’s Norris Cotton Cancer Center have utilized machine learning capabilities to assist with the challenging task of grading tumor patterns and subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma, the most common form of the leading cause of cancer-related […]

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A cell atlas of the aging lung

Aging promotes lung function decline and increases susceptibility to diseases of the respiratory tract. In order to understand these effects in detail, researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), analyzed the aging process in the lung at single-cell level using AI approaches. They have now presented this Atlas of the Aging Lung […]

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Patients now living a median 6.8 years after stage IV ALK+ lung cancer diagnosis

According to the National Cancer Institute, patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between the years 1995 and 2001 had 15 percent chance of being alive 5 years later. For patients with stage IV disease, describing cancer that has spread to distant sites beyond the original tumor, that statistic drops to 2 percent. Now a University of Colorado Cancer […]

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Lung cancer survival signal

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represents up to 25 percent of lung cancer cell deaths and is associated with early metastasis and poor patient survival. Thus, SCLC is in need of better therapeutics and more efficient targeted treatments. Jonathan Lehman, MD, PhD, Pierre Massion, MD,and colleagues have demonstrated that somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), considered to be a cell growth inhibitor, […]

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