New recommendations for endoscopic eradication therapy in Barrett’s esophagus

The latest issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the official journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), includes a new society guideline on use of endoscopic eradication therapy Barrett’s esophagus. A new guideline by the ASGE Standards of Practice Committee offers evidence-based recommendations and clinical guidelines addressing key issues related to Endoscopic Eradication Therapy (EET) in the management of […]

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In Europe, CHMP missed an opportunity for osteoporosis patients at high risk of fracture

Experts from the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) regret the recent decision by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) to reject the marketing application for abaloparatide, a potential new treatment option for postmenopausal women at high risk of […]

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Making headway in infant leukemia research

Around 600 children under the age of 15 are diagnosed with leukaemia each year in Germany. The effects are especially dramatic if this severe illness develops at birth or shortly afterwards. Research carried out at the Division of Genetics at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has now revealed another molecular cause for a particularly aggressive type of leukaemia in infants. The results […]

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Red or blue in the face? Study says conservatives show less emotion

If playing in a high-stakes poker game, it may be better to face opponents on the liberal side of the political spectrum. That’s because new research from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln has demonstrated a correlation between political ideology and facial expressivity: Conservatives have better poker faces, while liberals may allow more tells. Previous research has shown that people can identify […]

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Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashes

Rear-facing car seats have been shown to significantly reduce infant and toddler fatalities and injuries in frontal and side-impact crashes, but they’re rarely discussed in terms of rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing […]

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Adult-onset neurodegeneration has roots in early development

The disease mechanism for adult-onset progressive degenerative diseases begins much earlier than previously thought, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Using a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) genetically engineered to precisely mirror the human disease, a team of investigators showed that there is an altered neural circuitry in the cerebellum […]

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Relapse in major depression linked to brain cortical changes

(HealthDay)—For patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), relapse is associated with brain cortical changes over two years, according to a study published online March 28 in JAMA Psychiatry. Dario Zaremba, from the University of Münster in Germany, and colleagues conducted a longitudinal case-control study involving patients with acute MDD at baseline and healthy controls. Participants were subdivided into groups with […]

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