Estrogen receptors might hold key in obesity prevention

Despite countless fad diets, both obesity and metabolic diseases continue to plague communities across the U.S. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri believe that the clue to treatment might be related to estrogen—for both men and women. In two separate studies, Vicki Vieira Potter and Jaume Padilla, researchers in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, have found that […]

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First anticoagulant approved for preventing VTE recurrence in children

(HealthDay)—Fragmin (dalteparin sodium) injection has been granted the first approval for subcutaneous use in preventing recurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children aged 1 month or older, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced. Fragmin has been approved for use in adults since 1994. Approval in children was based on a trial of 38 pediatric patients with symptomatic deep […]

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One in seven babies born with low birthweight: study

More than 20 million newborns in 2015—one in seven—came into the world weighing too little, according to a global assessment of birthweight, published Thursday. Over 90 percent of babies tipping the scale at less than 2.5 kilos (5.5 pounds) when born were in low- and middle-income countries, researchers reported in The Lancet Global Health. Worldwide, just under 15 percent of […]

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Biochemical compound responsible for blood pressure drop in sepsis is discovered

A study conducted by an international group of researchers has overturned the understanding of life-threatening inflammatory diseases such as sepsis, pointing to a biochemical agent that may be involved in the rapid decline in blood pressure that occurs in the advanced stage of sepsis and usually causes the patient’s death. This discovery could pave the way for novel therapeutic approaches. […]

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Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study

Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable. To help preterm infants make a smooth transition to life outside of the womb, some NICUs have instituted set quiet times to limit children’s exposure to potentially dangerous levels of noise. Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, […]

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CDC: Prevalence of arthritis 22.8 percent in U.S. adults in 2017

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of arthritis was 22.8 percent in U.S. adults in 2017, with statewide variation in prevalence and in the prevalence of severe joint pain and physical inactivity among those with arthritis, according to research published in the May 3 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Dana Guglielmo, M.P.H., from the […]

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Cancer risk tools underused in general practice, research shows

Potentially life-saving cancer risk assessment tools are being widely underused by general practices across the UK, according to new research. A team of experts from the University of Exeter’s Medical School has designed a set of risk assessment tools—which can predict the likelihood of undiagnosed cancer based on patients’ symptoms, test results and other clinical information. Now, new NIHR-funded research […]

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AUA: Atenolol linked to drop in low-, intermediate-risk prostate cancer

(HealthDay)—Atenolol is associated with a reduction in incident intermediate- and low-risk prostate cancer (PCa), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 3 to 6 in Chicago. Ali Zahalka, M.D., Ph.D., from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, New York, and colleagues conducted a retrospective […]

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