Neuroscientists have gained new insight into how the brain predicts missing visual information

Neuroscientists at the University of Glasgow have gained new insight into how the brain predicts missing visual information when perceiving the outside world. The researchers, from the University’s Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, discovered that our brains “sketch out” portions of scenes that are not visible—much like how an artist sketches out a scene before filling the remaining details. The […]

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How to enable light to switch on and off therapeutic antibodies

When antigens such as a virus or bacteria invade our body, the immune system springs into action: it creates antibodies that stick to the antigens so that they can identify and destroy the intruders. Did you know that these Y-shaped proteins, AKA antibodies, have been revolutionizing the treatment of cancer, inflammatory disease and autoimmune disease, and many others? Therapeutic antibodies […]

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How neural circuits form in a developing embryo

Neurons, take your places. The cells that eventually become neurons must first travel across the embryo to reach their final destinations in the nervous system. There, they blossom from undefined cells into neurons with specific roles, working together in circuits to direct an animal’s behavior. But exactly how this journey unfolds is still somewhat mysterious. “There are lots of things […]

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Study reveals how fungal biofilm structure impacts lung disease

Findings from an innovative new study led by researchers at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine and published this week in Nature Microbiology reveal that the way in which human fungal pathogens form colonies can significantly impact their ability to cause disease. Highly diverse and adaptable, these colonies, known as biofilms, allow invasive fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus fumigatus to grow […]

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How can more walking be encouraged in cities?

A report investigating travel habits in seven European cities reveals environmental and social drivers that make people choose to walk. The new research reveals these include social factors such as how safe people feel and how concerned they are about air pollution, and urban design, such as how connected streets are and how close people are to public transport links. […]

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How Does a Creative Brain Work?

There is a common perception that the right-side of our brain is responsible for logic and analysis, while the left side is responsible for innovation and creativity. An extension of this understanding states that those who think more with the right side of their brains are more logical and have greater analytical skills, while those who are more inclined towards […]

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New research sheds light on how happy couples argue

In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue. And research shows they tend to argue about the same topics as unhappy couples: children, money, in-laws, intimacy. So, what distinguishes happy couples? According to “What are the Marital Problems of Happy Couples? A Multimethod, Two-Sample Investigation,” a study published this August in Family Process, it is the way happy […]

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