How to mend broken hearts

Dr. Richard Jabbour’s mission is to fix broken hearts. But he doesn’t dispense relationship advice or provide a shoulder to cry on – as no doubt many others will be doing this Valentine’s Day. Instead, he builds healing, pumping ‘patches’ in a small dish that can help to mend damaged heart tissue. Dr. Jabbour, a cardiologist and researcher, is part […]

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Having a sense of meaning in life is good for you. So how do you get one?

The pursuit of happiness and health is a popular endeavour, as the preponderance of self-help books would attest. Yet it is also fraught. Despite ample advice from experts, individuals regularly engage in activities that may only have short-term benefit for well-being, or even backfire. The search for the heart of well-being – that is, a nucleus from which other aspects […]

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Researchers factoring in how children learn mathematics

What is 72 multiplied by 12? While fourth-graders will focus on arriving at the correct answer, University of Nebraska-Lincoln researcher Carrie Clark wants to know what happens in the brain as they learn to solve the problem. Clark, assistant professor of educational psychology, is using functional MRI technology to capture brain activity while children learn mathematics. Housed at the Nebraska […]

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How do children draw themselves? It depends who’s looking

It’s the archetypal child’s drawing—family, pet, maybe a house and garden, and the child themselves. Yet how do children represent themselves in their drawings, and does this representation alter according to who will look at the picture? A research team led by academics from the University of Chichester has examined this issue and found that children’s expressive drawings of themselves […]

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How brains distinguish between self-touch and touch by others

The brain seems to reduce sensory perception from an area of skin when we touch it ourselves, according to a new study from Linköping University published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The finding increases the understanding of how the brain distinguishes between being touched by another person and self-touch. The ability to distinguish between self […]

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How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome

Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers in the Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CNRS/Université de Bordeaux) have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport. This work, carried out with colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin (USA), was published in […]

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Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer

Poor diet and lack of exercise are associated with cancer development, but the underlying biology is not well understood. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) could offer a biological link to help us understand how certain lifestyle behaviors increase cancer risk or lessen the likelihood that an anti-cancer therapy will be effective. AGE accumulation is the natural and unavoidable result of […]

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How cholera bacteria make people so sick

The enormous adaptability of the cholera bacterium explains why it is able to claim so many victims. Professor Ariane Briegel from the Leiden Institute of Biology has now discovered that this adaptability is due to rapid sensory changes in the bacterium. Her research has been published in PNAS. The Vibrio cholerae bacterium is the cause of cholera, a devastating illness […]

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