Cancer pain can be eased by palliative radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is, along with chemotherapy and surgery, one of the three main components of cancer treatment. It is often misunderstood and carries negative connotations. As radiation oncologists and assistant professors at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and the University of British Columbia, we frequently work to dispel patients’ concerns about radiation —concerns that radiation treatment will […]

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Weight stigmatization by medical professionals is preventable, researcher says

Anti-fat stigmatization is a common problem in Canada’s health-care system, but one that is preventable, says Dr. Patty Thille, assistant professor of physical therapy in the College of Rehabilitation Sciences. “There are strong stereotypes around bodies that are thin or bodies that have visible fat,” Thille says. “And we know from qualitative studies that people experience poor treatment in health-care […]

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How brains distinguish between self-touch and touch by others

The brain seems to reduce sensory perception from an area of skin when we touch it ourselves, according to a new study from Linköping University published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The finding increases the understanding of how the brain distinguishes between being touched by another person and self-touch. The ability to distinguish between self […]

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Calcifications in the eye increase risk for progression to advanced AMD by more than six times

Calcified nodules in the retina are associated with progression to late stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Experts from Queen’s University Belfast, working in partnership with the University of Alabama of Birmingham and in collaboration with UK material scientists and US clinical ophthalmology practices, made the ground-breaking discovery that the calcified nodules in the retina – the thin layer of […]

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Breast cancer’s deadliness is influenced by genes

An international team of scientists have confirmed that both rare and common mutations of our genes are linked to the development of breast cancer, including tumour characteristics and corresponding deadliness. Interestingly, they discovered that the rare mutations were linked to more aggressive tumours, while the common mutations were associated with less aggressive tumour characteristics. The study was led by Dr. […]

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Pneumonia-causing bacteria can be spread by nose picking and rubbing

Pneumonia-causing bacteria can be spread through picking and rubbing the nose, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal. Pneumococcus, the bacteria that can cause pneumonia, is known to be spread through inhalation of airborne droplets containing the bacteria, for example in coughs and sneezes. This study is the first to show that transmission can also occur via […]

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Hormone helps reverse brain damage caused by obesity

The neurobiotechnology research team of the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) in Castellón, Spain, headed by professor Ana María Sánchez, has proven the positive effects of a vegetable hormone, reversing brain alterations caused by high-fat diets, type-2 diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity. The results of this work, developed by the Health Sciences Department, have been published in Molecular Neurobiology. “We have […]

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Study: Improvement in glycemic parameters by adding dapagliflozin to metformin in T2D

Researchers used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to assess the effects of adding dapagliflozin to a regimen of either metformin or insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and found significant reductions in mean glucose and other glycemic factors, with greater improvements seen in patients taking metformin compared to insulin. The design and results of this trial are published in […]

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