The flu virus’s ability to mutate may sometimes be its downfall

One of influenza virus’s main weapons is actually a double-edged sword. The virus’s ability to rapidly mutate lets it escape from the immune system’s memory and explains why people can be repeatedly re-infected with flu—unlike measles or polio. But those mutations can also blow the virus’s cover, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Jesse Bloom and colleagues reported May 8, 2019, […]

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Patients with diabetes are 40 percent more likely to be readmitted to the hospital

Patients with diabetes and low blood glucose have higher rates of death following hospital discharge, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The cost for hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge is estimated to be close to $25 billion per year in the U.S. Patients with diabetes are frequently admitted to […]

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Cancer pain can be eased by palliative radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is, along with chemotherapy and surgery, one of the three main components of cancer treatment. It is often misunderstood and carries negative connotations. As radiation oncologists and assistant professors at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and the University of British Columbia, we frequently work to dispel patients’ concerns about radiation —concerns that radiation treatment will […]

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Does that medicine work for women? Why signing up for a medical study could be your next feminist move

You’ve marched in the Women’s March, cheered for women in Congress, grappled with the wide-ranging implications of the MeToo movement, talked with your kids (of both genders) about sexual harassment. Wait—did you forget to sign up for a medical study? In the new pantheon of Women’s Causes We Care About, inclusion in medical research has often ranked somewhere below concern […]

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