New nanomedicines for a more efficient and less aggressive treatment of prostate cancer

In Europe, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men with an incidence greater than 100 cases per 100,000 individuals. Furthermore, it is currently the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths among men. This pathology mainly affects elderly men: nine in 10 deaths take place after 65 years of age. Therefore, it represents a very serious […]

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Aggressive behavior brings emotional pain to the sadist

People with sadistic personality traits tend to be aggressive, but only enjoy their aggressive acts if it harms their victims. According to a series of studies of over 2000 people, these actions ultimately leave sadists feeling worse than they felt before their aggressive act. The research appears in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, published by the Society for Personality and […]

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Fat fuels aggressive brain cancers

Fat is powering tumour growth in brain cancer, finds a new study by Cardiff University and the University of Florida. Investigating the different types of cells in glioblastoma, the research team have gained a valuable insight into what fuels slow and fast dividing cancer cells, unveiling the potential to target aggressive brain cancer more effectively. Dr. Florian Siebzehnrubl, European Cancer […]

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Media violence, impulsivity and family conflict tied to aggressive behaviors in teenagers

Teenagers exposed to TV and film violence and high levels of household conflict are at risk of engaging in aggressive behaviors, according to a new study by researchers at three U.S. universities. Especially prone to aggressive tendencies are those who also have high levels of impulsivity, the six-member research team reported in a study published online ahead of print in […]

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Researchers find adult stem cell characteristics in aggressive cancers from different tissues

UCLA researchers have discovered genetic similarities between the adult stem cells responsible for maintaining and repairing epithelial tissues—which line all of the organs and cavities inside the body—and the cells that drive aggressive epithelial cancers. Their findings could bring about a better understanding of how aggressive, treatment-resistant cancers develop and progress, and could eventually lead to new drugs for a […]

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Dying cancer cells make remaining glioblastoma cells more aggressive and therapy-resistant

A surprising form of cell-to-cell communication in glioblastoma promotes global changes in recipient cells, including aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy. Paradoxically, the sending cells in this signaling are glioblastoma cells that are undergoing programmed cell death, or apoptosis, according to research by a team at institutes in the United States, Russia and South Korea. The dying cancer […]

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Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumors

The first genetic marker for the bone tumour, osteoblastoma, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of human bone tumours revealed that a genetic change that affects the transcription factor, FOS, is a hallmark mutation of osteoblastoma. The results, published in Nature Communications, will help clinicians correctly distinguish benign osteoblastoma […]

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Trial identifies a medulloblastoma subset that requires less aggressive therapy

The youngest patients with the brain tumor medulloblastoma are among the most challenging because their rapidly developing brains limit treatment options. Now a team of researchers led by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered a subtype that responds to a therapy that is less likely to cause long-term cognitive problems. The report appears today in the journal Lancet Oncology […]

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Research finds ‘Achilles heel’ for aggressive prostate cancer

UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a promising new line of attack against lethal, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Analysis of hundreds of human prostate tumors revealed that the most aggressive cancers depend on a built-in cellular stress response to put a brake on their own hot-wired physiology. Experiments in mice and with human cells showed that blocking this stress response with […]

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