Can a brain injury change who you are?

Who we are, and what makes us “us” has been the topic of much debate throughout history. At the individual level, the ingredients for the unique essence of a person consist mostly of personality concepts. Things like kindness, warmth, hostility and selfishness. Deeper than this, however, is how we react to the world around us, respond socially, our moral reasoning, […]

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Global ROS1 initiative: A patient-researcher collaboration targeting ROS1 cancer

Cancer patients have often organized support and informational groups around their disease types. Now a presentation at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2018 describes the first research-focused group of patients organized around the genetic mutation that creates their cancer, namely changes to the gene ROS1. While “ROS1 fusion” has primarily been studied in lung cancer, the […]

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Punjab, India: Mass treatment of a population with chronic hepatitis C infection produces high rates of cure

A large-scale study evaluating the feasibility of decentralized care and the provision of free direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has reported high rates of cure among a population of almost 20,000 individuals completing treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The study conducted in Punjab, India, which was reported today at The International Liver Congress 2018 in Paris, France, validated the […]

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A third of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis across the world are multi-drug resistant

A worldwide study initiated to investigate the epidemiology and outcomes of bacterial infections in hospitalized patients with liver cirrhosis has reported a prevalence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacteria of 34% and significant regional differences in the risk of developing a multi-drug-resistant infection. Research teams from 46 centres across the world collaborated in this international study, which was promoted by the International […]

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Italy: Ongoing hepatitis A virus outbreak among men who have sex with men is linked to current outbreaks in Europe

Hepatitis A viruses (HAVs) circulating in an ongoing outbreak among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Lombardy region of Italy are predominantly attributable to strains linked to two other recent outbreaks in Europe, according to a study presented today at The International Liver Congress 2018 in Paris, France. The study found that earlier cases in the Lombardy […]

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Sunshine could hold clues on the timing for a severe form of heart attack, study says

The sun’s radiation could be a factor in seasonal patterns of a deadly type of heart attack, according to new research that tracked a “summer shift” in their occurrence across seven countries. Previous research has examined how these attacks – called ST-elevation myocardial infarctions, or STEMIs – seem to happen most often in the daytime during the colder winter months, […]

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Index of tumor cells opens a new perspective to prevent cancer progression

Researchers from the School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto (FMRP), at the University of São Paulo (USP), in collaboration with international groups, have developed indices that provide information about the prognosis of cancers, aid in the choice of the most appropriate therapy and identify potential targets for the development of new drugs. Their paper, titled “Machine Learning Identity Stemness Features […]

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Relaxation response may reduce blood pressure by altering expression of a set of genes

High blood pressure—or hypertension—is a major risk factor for heart attack and stroke that affects as many as 100 million Americans and 1 billion people worldwide. Decades of research have demonstrated that the relaxation response—the physiological and psychological opposite of the well-known fight-or-flight stress response that can be achieved through relaxation techniques like yoga or mediation – can reduce blood […]

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Study examines how social support affects mental health after a natural disaster

A new Journal of Traumatic Stress study found that social support may have helped alleviate depressive symptoms for displaced and nondisplaced residents who survived Hurricane Katrina. Also, social support appeared to only moderate the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms for nondisplaced residents, indicating that displaced individuals may require more formal supports for reducing PTSD symptoms following a natural […]

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