New nanomedicines for a more efficient and less aggressive treatment of prostate cancer

In Europe, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men with an incidence greater than 100 cases per 100,000 individuals. Furthermore, it is currently the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths among men. This pathology mainly affects elderly men: nine in 10 deaths take place after 65 years of age. Therefore, it represents a very serious […]

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Genetic variations in a fourth gene linked to elevated leukemia risk in Hispanic children

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have identified genetic variations in a fourth gene that are associated with an increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in Hispanic children. The research appears today in the journal Blood. The gene is ERG, a transcription factor that is also mutated in the leukemic cells of some ALL patients. In this study, researchers […]

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Having a sense of meaning in life is good for you. So how do you get one?

The pursuit of happiness and health is a popular endeavour, as the preponderance of self-help books would attest. Yet it is also fraught. Despite ample advice from experts, individuals regularly engage in activities that may only have short-term benefit for well-being, or even backfire. The search for the heart of well-being – that is, a nucleus from which other aspects […]

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Does that medicine work for women? Why signing up for a medical study could be your next feminist move

You’ve marched in the Women’s March, cheered for women in Congress, grappled with the wide-ranging implications of the MeToo movement, talked with your kids (of both genders) about sexual harassment. Wait—did you forget to sign up for a medical study? In the new pantheon of Women’s Causes We Care About, inclusion in medical research has often ranked somewhere below concern […]

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Researchers 3-D bio-print a model that could lead to improved anticancer drugs and treatments

University of Minnesota researchers have developed a way to study cancer cells which could lead to new and improved treatment. They have developed a new way to study these cells in a 3-D in vitro model (i.e. in a culture dish rather than in a human or animal). In a paper recently published in Advanced Materials, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Ph.D., Vice […]

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A proposal to reduce vaccine exemptions while respecting rights of conscience

Vaccine resistance is one of the top 10 threats to global health in 2019, according to the World Health Organization. Here in the U.S., New York City is currently experiencing its worst outbreak of measles in decades, sickening scores of children in ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods. Other clustered outbreaks of deadly and highly contagious, but vaccine-preventable, diseases are becoming frustratingly routine […]

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How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome

Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers in the Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CNRS/Université de Bordeaux) have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport. This work, carried out with colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin (USA), was published in […]

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Developing a better, faster diagnostic for cryptosporidiosis

Cryptosporidiosis is the leading cause of waterborne diseases among humans in the United States, infecting almost 750,000 people each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Globally in 2010, nearly 100,000 cases were fatal. The disease is of particular interest to Dr. Michael Riggs, a veterinarian and professor in the Department of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences […]

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