Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashes

Rear-facing car seats have been shown to significantly reduce infant and toddler fatalities and injuries in frontal and side-impact crashes, but they’re rarely discussed in terms of rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing […]

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Treating women subsistence farmers for intestinal worms improved fitness and could boost food production

A new study in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) found that treating women subsistence farmers with just a single dose of a cheap deworming medication significantly improved their physical stamina for the grueling agriculture work needed for their family’s survival. The results of treatment could be twofold: improved health for farming women and increased food production by women who […]

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New technique makes heart valve replacement safer for some high-risk patients

Scientists have developed a novel technique that prevents coronary artery obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a rare but often fatal complication. The method, called Bioprosthetic Aortic Scallop Intentional Laceration to prevent Iatrogenic Coronary Artery obstruction (BASILICA), will increase treatment options for high-risk patients who need heart valve procedures. The findings by researchers at the National Institutes of Health […]

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Sulfur amino acid restriction could amount to new dietary approach to health

The longevity and health improvements seen in animals on sulfur amino acid-restricted diets could translate to people, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers who recently conducted a review of published studies. More research is needed to confirm the benefits in people, the scientists said. Amino acids are the building blocks of all proteins in the body. A subcategory […]

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ACA has provided better access to care for cancer survivors

(HealthDay)—Cancer survivors are more likely to have difficulty accessing and affording health care, but the proportion reporting these issues is decreasing, according to a study published online March 29 in JAMA Oncology. Ryan D. Nipp, M.D., M.P.H., from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues used data from the National Health Interview Survey to examine health […]

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Adult-onset neurodegeneration has roots in early development

The disease mechanism for adult-onset progressive degenerative diseases begins much earlier than previously thought, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Using a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) genetically engineered to precisely mirror the human disease, a team of investigators showed that there is an altered neural circuitry in the cerebellum […]

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Researchers define target and mechanism of antibacterial drug fidaxomicin (Dificid)

A team of Rutgers University and international scientists has determined the molecular target and mechanism of the antibacterial drug fidaxomicin (trade name Dificid). Fidaxomicin was approved in 2011 for treatment of the CDC “urgent threat” bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (C. diff) and currently is one of two front-line drugs for treatment of C. diff. Fidaxomicin also exhibits potent antibacterial activity […]

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Slow, steady waves keep brain humming

If you keep a close eye on an MRI scan of the brain, you’ll see a wave pass through the entire brain like a heartbeat once every few seconds. This ultra-slow rhythm was recognized decades ago, but no one quite knew what to make of it. MRI data are inherently noisy, so most researchers simply ignored the ultra-slow waves. But […]

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