Psoriasis negatively affects patient sleep quality

(HealthDay)—Patients with psoriasis commonly report poor sleep, with itch being the main predictor, according to a study published online April 28 in the British Journal of Dermatology. Peter Jensen, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, and colleagues examined the prevalence of sleep disturbance in 179 patients with plaque psoriasis compared to 105 controls. The researchers found that […]

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Gene study spots clues to heart risk for statin patients

A Vanderbilt-led research team has discovered genetic variations that increase the risk of heart attack even when patients are receiving a statin drug like Lipitor or Crestor to lower their blood cholesterol. The finding, published by the journal Circulation, helps explain why some patients experience a heart attack or the need for coronary revascularization to open blocked heart arteries while […]

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Breast cancer: Discovery of a protein linked to metastasis

Jean-François Côté, a researcher at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) and professor at Université de Montréal’s Faculty of Medicine, studies metastasis, the leading cause of cancer-related death. Recently, his team uncovered a protein that, once deactivated, could prevent the development of metastases in an aggressive type of cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer. One in eight women will be diagnosed with […]

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Factors associated with sexual coercion among adolescents in rural communities

A new study examining factors associated with sexual coercion among 10th graders in a rural Midwestern, low-to-middle income high school found that sexual coercion was reported by 18 percent (13 percent of males and 23 percent females). The research findings will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting. Predictors included age, race, ethnicity, prior alcohol, marijuana and/or […]

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At-risk adolescents are less likely to express depression on social media as they age

Findings from a new study reveal at-risk adolescents are less likely to post about depressive symptoms on social media as they age. The research suggests that adolescents with a diagnosis of depression may feel less stigmatized describing depressed mood on social media than previously hypothesized. The research will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting in Toronto. […]

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New studies measure screen-based media use in children

A new study examines the effectiveness of the ScreenQ, a measure of screen-based media use in children. Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting. “In a single generation, the explosion of screen-based media has transformed the experience of childhood, from TV and videos, to an unlimited range of content available at any […]

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Reduction in federal funding could reduce quality of specialized pediatric care

Hospitals caring for children with serious, chronic illness are highly dependent on public payers, according to a new study. The research found that proposals to dramatically reduce federal expenditures on Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) could destabilize current specialty care referral networks serving all children, including the majority of privately-insured children in greatest need of high quality, specialized, […]

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EPO protects preemies’ brains by modifying genes essential for generating new brain cells

Erythropoietin (EPO) helps to protect and repair vulnerable brains though it remains a mystery how the anemia drug does so. Genetic analyses conducted by a multi-institutional research team finds that EPO may work its neuroprotective magic by modifying genes essential for regulating growth and development of nervous tissue as well as genes that respond to inflammation and hypoxia. Findings from […]

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Study uses eye tracking to assess receptive language in children

A new study found that eye tracking (ET) can be explored as a modality for assessing receptive language (RL) in typically developing (TD) children and those with neurodevelopmental delay (NDD). The research findings will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting in Toronto. NDD assessment in children with significant motor delays (e.g., cerebral palsy), which is often […]

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