US approves new drug for prevention of migraines

Migraine sufferers on Thursday got some relief from US regulators who approved the first of a new class of drugs for migraine prevention. The United States Food and Drug Administration said it endorsed Aimovig for prevention of migraine in adults, through monthly self-injections. Aimovig is the first in a new class of drugs that work by blocking the activity of […]

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Learning music or speaking another language leads to more efficient brains

Whether you learn to play a musical instrument or speak another language, you’re training your brain to be more efficient, suggests a Baycrest study. Researchers found that musicians and people who are bilingual utilized fewer brain resources when completing a working memory task, according to recently published findings in the journal, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Individuals […]

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Mass-drug administration curbs scabies for asylum seekers in the Netherlands

In a new article published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Sofanne J. Ravensbergen of the University of Groningen, and colleagues, found that a scabies intervention program (SIP) was effective in reducing the severity of scabies when introduced to the newly arrived Eritrean and Ethiopian asylum seekers who volunteered to take part in the program. Scabies, a skin infestation caused by […]

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Automated system better identifies patients at risk for ventilator-associated pneumonia

An automated system for identifying patients at risk for complications associated with the use of mechanical ventilators provided significantly more accurate results than did traditional surveillance methods, which rely on manual recording and interpretation of individual patient data. In their paper published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team report that their system—using an […]

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Four questions—chronic pain and how it affects the brain

Chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million Americans, and its impact goes beyond physical discomfort. New research, led by University of Arizona psychologist Stephen Cowen, illustrates how chronic pain may impact cognitive abilities, such as decision making, as well. Cowen and UA professor of pharmacology Frank Porreca, along with their collaborators at Eli Lilly, investigated how pain impacts cognitive flexibility, […]

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‘Lone wolf’ protein offers new pathway to cancer treatments

Structural biologists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered how a key protein functions to trigger cell’s suicide machinery, called apoptosis. The scientists found that the protein, called BOK, is controlled separately from the rest of the apoptosis process—offering the potential for new drugs to more selectively kill cancer cells. Led by Tudor Moldoveanu, Ph.D., an assistant member of […]

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Single surface protein boosts multiple oncogenic pathways in acute myeloid leukemia

Researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study, which will be published May 17 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein […]

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Peripheral neuropathy common in childhood cancer survivors

(HealthDay)—Childhood cancer survivors frequently have clinical abnormalities attributable to peripheral neuropathy, according to a study published online May 14 in JAMA Neurology. Tejaswi Kandula, M.B.B.S., from the University of New South Wales in Sidney, and colleagues recruited cancer survivors who were treated with chemotherapy for extracranial malignancy before age 17 years and compared them with healthy age-matched controls. One hundred […]

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New algorithm more accurately predicts life expectancy after heart failure

A new algorithm developed by UCLA researchers more accurately predicts which people will survive heart failure, and for how long, whether or not they receive a heart transplant. The algorithm would allow doctors to make more personalized assessments of people who are awaiting heart transplants, which in turn could enable health care providers to make better use of limited life-saving […]

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