Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety

Caring for family members with dementia—which is on the rise in the U.S.—causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers’ risk of depression, anxiety and death. A new method of coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks, reports a new national Northwestern Medicine study. It […]

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Patients with diabetes are 40 percent more likely to be readmitted to the hospital

Patients with diabetes and low blood glucose have higher rates of death following hospital discharge, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The cost for hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge is estimated to be close to $25 billion per year in the U.S. Patients with diabetes are frequently admitted to […]

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Suicide attempts by self-poisoning have more than doubled in teens, young adults

A new study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Central Ohio Poison Center found rates of suicide attempts by self-poisoning among adolescents have more than doubled in the last decade in the U.S., and more than tripled for girls and young women. The study, published online today in the Journal of Pediatrics, evaluated the incidence and outcomes from intentional suspected-suicide […]

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Maternal comorbidity higher for women with congenital heart defects

(HealthDay)—Pregnant women with congenital heart defects (CHDs) are more likely to have comorbidities and experience adverse events during delivery, according to a study published in the May 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Using multivariable logistic regression, Lauren E. Schlichting, Ph.D., of the Hassenfeld Child Health Innovation Institute at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, […]

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Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses

The line between the human herpes simplex viruses—HSV-1 and HSV-2—is blurrier than previously thought, according to a new study published this week in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Researchers found that HSV-1 and HSV-2 are mixing together to result in several new, different recombinant versions of herpes. “The main implication is that HSV-1 and HSV-2 are continuing to recombine,” said […]

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Fat cell discovery could help combat obesity-related health issues

Researchers have discovered differences in fat cells that could potentially identify people predisposed to metabolic diseases such as diabetes and fatty liver disease. The world-first discovery also identified ‘fast burning’ fat cells that if unlocked might help people lose weight. About 70 per cent of Australians are overweight or obese, which has been linked to metabolic disease risk. The University […]

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Gender impacts brain activity in alcoholics

Compared to alcoholic women, alcoholic men have more diminished brain activity in areas responsible for emotional processing (limbic regions including the amygdala and hippocampus), as well as memory and social processing (cortical regions including the superior frontal and supramarginal regions) among other functions. In 2015, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health Alcoholism found 15.1 million adults have Alcohol […]

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Scientists discover how superbugs hide from their host

New research led by the University of Sheffield has discovered how a hospital superbug evades the immune system to cause infection – paving the way for new treatments. The study, led by the University of Sheffield’s Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, investigated how Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), bacteria commonly found in the digestive tracts of humans, cause life-threatening infections. […]

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