CDC: Prevalence of arthritis 22.8 percent in U.S. adults in 2017

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of arthritis was 22.8 percent in U.S. adults in 2017, with statewide variation in prevalence and in the prevalence of severe joint pain and physical inactivity among those with arthritis, according to research published in the May 3 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Dana Guglielmo, M.P.H., from the […]

Continue reading »

Oral aspirin does not up FIT test sensitivity for ID’ing CRC

(HealthDay)—Administration of a single dose of oral aspirin prior to fecal immunochemical testing does not increase test sensitivity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasms, according to a study published in the May 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Hermann Brenner, M.D., M.P.H., from the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues conducted a randomized trial in […]

Continue reading »

Cancer risk tools underused in general practice, research shows

Potentially life-saving cancer risk assessment tools are being widely underused by general practices across the UK, according to new research. A team of experts from the University of Exeter’s Medical School has designed a set of risk assessment tools—which can predict the likelihood of undiagnosed cancer based on patients’ symptoms, test results and other clinical information. Now, new NIHR-funded research […]

Continue reading »

FDA approves treatments for heart failure caused by rare disease

(HealthDay)—Vyndaqel (tafamidis meglumine) and Vyndamax (tafamidis) capsules have been approved to treat adults with cardiomyopathy caused by transthyretin mediated amyloidosis (ATTR-CM), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today. Recommended dosage is four 20-mg capsules of Vyndaqel once daily or a single 61-mg capsule of Vyndamax once daily, according to the manufacturer. The two drugs, which are the first approved […]

Continue reading »

Researchers advance understanding of atrial fibrillation-related dementia

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have determined that atrial fibrillation (Afib) is independently associated with changes that occur with aging and dementia. “Atrial Fibrillation and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities” published in Stroke advances researchers’ understanding of the mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation-related dementia. Jeremy Berman, a University of Minnesota cardiology fellow is the first author of this paper. It […]

Continue reading »

AUA: Atenolol linked to drop in low-, intermediate-risk prostate cancer

(HealthDay)—Atenolol is associated with a reduction in incident intermediate- and low-risk prostate cancer (PCa), according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 3 to 6 in Chicago. Ali Zahalka, M.D., Ph.D., from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, New York, and colleagues conducted a retrospective […]

Continue reading »

Unexpectedly big wins improve two kinds of memory

Researchers have discovered that instances in which outcomes are better than expected—finding an unexpectedly good parking spot, for example, or spotting a $20 bill on the sidewalk—improves memories of specific events. This is in addition to the long-established role that unexpectedly good outcomes have in influencing what are called integrated memories. Remembering where you parked your car this morning is […]

Continue reading »

Making the invisible visible: New method opens unexplored realms for liquid biopsies

Advancing technology is allowing scientists increasingly to search for tiny signs of cancer and other health issues in samples of patients’ blood and urine. These “liquid biopsies” are less invasive than a traditional biopsy, and can provide information about what’s happening throughout the body instead of just at a single site. Now researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer […]

Continue reading »

New study tracks perils of water polo head injuries

Water polo athletes take note: A new study by University of California, Irvine researchers maps out the frequency of head injuries in the sport and reveals which positions are the most vulnerable. The first-of-its-kind report, which tracked several dozen male collegiate water polo players over three seasons, was published today in PLOS One, a peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal. “For years, […]

Continue reading »
1 2 3 4 137